Seattle

608,660 (City), 3,671,478 (Metro)

Pacific

Oceanic or temperate marine (cool, wet winters and warm, relatively dry summers)

Inside Tips About Seattle

READY? YOUR NEW TEAM IS IN…

Moving to Seattle? You almost ended up moving to New York. In the 1850s, a couple of explorers claimed the land now known as Alki Point and named it New York Alki. Why? Uncertain. Possibly because some of the expedition members were from New York. And Alki is a Chinook word meaning by and by. Eventually, a more sensible head prevailed and the area was name for Chief Seattle. Despite the ostensible honor, relations with the Native American tribes were iffy, and at one point culminated in an only moderately enthusiastic battle.

The city of Seattle is like many others that have relied on natural and mineral resources: it has a history of going boom and bust repeatedly. Seattles first boom was as a lumber town—which eventually wiped out extraordinary, old-growth forests towering to 400 feet. During this time, there was plenty of labor tensions as well as ethnic tensions. Violent riots by out-of-work whites against Chinese laborers inspired a declaration of martial law and intervention by federal troops. The first bust came with the Panic of 1893, a nationwide depression that hit Seattle especially hard.

Neighborhoods

Living In and Around Seattle

If you’re looking to live Downtown, be ready: with a median income of under $50,000 and a median home price of almost $600,000, were talking an unusual place with a seriously challenging cost of living. That said, it’s also highly walkable, with lots of fit people, cyclists, green space, farmers markets and (yes) coffee. Denny Triangle gets lots of press, especially with Amazons new campus going there. Expect to spend close to half a million for a 700-square-foot 1-bed/1-bath. Pioneer Square is considered by some as the epicenter of Seattle nightlife. Expect to spend the same price or more for such a unit there, and upwards of one million for a 2-bed/2-bath. Also be expected for somewhat lower prices in neighborhoods that aren’t quite as desirable—and really limited inventory across the board.

The highest named hill in the city, Queen Anne was once home to Seattles elite. Up top, you’ll find a wide range of real estate, from small family homes to big mansions. You’ll find excellent amenities, good schools, and a cost of living that is as high as you’d expect. As expensive as it is, young families still gravitate here. Young professionals congregate more towards the bottom of the hill. Trendy Ballard strikes a balance between an urban and neighborhood environment. You can find new construction, older bungalows, families and young professionals. It’s also very environmentally conscientious, with several initiatives ranging from combatting sprawl to getting people out of cars. There’s even an effort to make it the nations first carbon neutral community. Old Town Ballard offers tree-lined streets with trendy shops, restaurants and popular dive bars.

You’ll find a lot of families in West Seattle, since it’s possible to find decent sized homes that won’t break the bank. The median home price is just south of half a million. An older neighborhood (many neighborhoods, really), you’ll find older homes, often renovated, and something lacking in many other parts of town: actual inventory. A walkable neighborhood center called The Junction offers bars, restaurants and shops. Columbia City is a hip and diverse neighborhood for urban pioneers. Real estate ranges from older bungalows and Craftsman homes to big-money properties on the hills. Excellent amenities, good schools, and easier access to downtown are making it desirable.

If you’ve got money to burn, Madison Park might call your name. One of Seattles most expensive neighborhoods, it’s like a village oasis in the city. Highly walkable with great amenities, Madison park is popular with families and seniors. Just don’t expect much nightlife. Do expect a median home price of almost a million and limited inventory. More affordable Mount Baker offers higher-end homes, craftsman bungalows, newer townhomes and tree-lined streets. High scores for walkability and amenities, decent schools and a lower-key vibe than the city are attracting folks to this friendly neighborhood with an active community. Equally affordable Leschi offers an array of options, many with water views. There are condos along the lake, bungalows and craftsman homes, Tudors and contemporaries. Yes, there are million-dollar homes alone the lakefront, but there are also more modest options. And the local populous is racially and economically diverse. And the schools get excellent grades.

Ravenna has recently been one of Seattles most competitive housing markets as well as one of the nations hottest neighborhoods. Another neighborhood of desirable Craftsman and Tudor homes, it’s a place that people love to live. The median home price is pushing $600,000—and homes have been known to go for 20% over the asking price. (Need we say highly ranked schools?) Greenwood is not nearly as trendy or as expensive, but it is gaining momentum with young families and other first-time home buyers. Like Ballard, mentioned earlier, Greenwood has a small-town neighborhood feel. Youll also find fewer condos, an active main street, plenty of restaurants, and relatively easy access to downtown.

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